stalf0s
thesciencellama:

13 Must See Stargazing Events for 2013— Listed In Chronological Order 
1) January 21 — Very Close Moon/Jupiter Conjunction
A waxing gibbous moon (78% illuminated) will pass within less than a degree to the south of Jupiter high in the evening sky. Your closed fist held out at arms length covers 10 degrees. These two wont get that close again until 2026.
2) February 2-23 — Best Evening View of Mercury
The planet Mercury will be far enough away from the glare of the Sun to be visible in the Western sky after sunset. It will be at its brightest on the 16th and dim quickly afterwards. On the 8th it will skim by the much dimmer planet Mars by about 0.4 degrees.
3) March 10-24 — Comet PANSTARRS at its best
First discovered in 2011, this comet should be coming back around for about 2 weeks. It will be visible low in the northwest sky after sunset. Here are some sources predicting what the comets may look like in the sky; 1, 2
4) April 25 — Partial Lunar Eclipse
A very minor, partial lunar eclipse (not visible in North America) where only about 2 percent of the moon’s diameter will be inside the dark shadow of the Earth.
5) May 9 — Annular Eclipse of the Sun (“Ring of Fire” Eclipse)
It will be visible in Northern Australia and parts of Papua New Guinea but mostly within the Pacific Ocean. See all the solar eclipse paths for 2001-2020 here.
6) May 24-30 — Dance of the Planets
Mercury, Venus and Jupiter will seemingly dance between each other in the twilight sky just after sunset as they will change their positions from one evening to the next. Venus will be the brightest of all, six times brighter than Jupiter.
7) June 23 — Biggest Full Moon of 2013
It will be the biggest full moon because the moon will be the closest to the Earth at this time making it a ‘supermoon’ and the tides will be affected as well creating exceptionally high and low tides for the next few days.
8) August 12 — Perseid Meteor Shower
One of the best and most reliable meteor showers of the year producing upwards of 90 meteors per hour provided the sky is dark. This year the moon won’t be in the way as much as it will set during the evening leaving the rest of the night dark. Here is a useful dark-sky finder tool.
9) October 18 — Penumbral Eclipse of the Moon
Visible mostly in Asia, Europe and Africa, at this time the 76% of the moon will be covered by the penumbral shadow of the Earth.
10) November 3 — Hybrid Eclipse of the Sun
A Hybrid Eclipse meaning, along its path, the eclipse will turn from Annular to Total and in this case most of the path will appear to be Total as there will be a slight ring of sunlight visible near the beginning of the track. This one will begin in the Atlantic (near the East Coast of the U.S.) and travel through Africa. See the path here. The greatest eclipse (with 100 seconds of totality) will appear in Liberia, near the West Coast of Africa.
11) Mid-November through December — Comet ISON
The second comet this year, ISON, could potentially be visible in broad daylight as it reaches its closest point to the Sun. It will reach that point on November 28 and it is close enough to the Sun to be categorized as a ‘Sungrazer’. Afterwards it will travel towards Earth (passing by within 40 million miles) a month later.
12) All of December — Dazzling Venus
The brightest planet of them all will shine a few hours after sundown in the Southwestern sky and for about 1.5 hours approaching New Years Eve. Around December 5th, a crescent moon will pass above the planet and the next night Venus will be at its brightest and wont be again until 2021.
13) December 13-14 — Geminid Meteor Shower
This is another great (if not the best) annual meteor shower. This year put on a show at about 120 meteors per hour and in 2013 it won’t be much different so expect another fantastic show. However, the moon - as it is a few days before full phase - will be in the way for most of the night obscuring some of the fainter meteors. You might have to stay up in the early morning hours (4am) to catch the all the meteors it has to offer. If you missed 2012’s Geminid Meteor Shower, here are some great photo-sets; 1, 2, 3

thesciencellama:

13 Must See Stargazing Events for 2013
— Listed In Chronological Order 

1) January 21 — Very Close Moon/Jupiter Conjunction

A waxing gibbous moon (78% illuminated) will pass within less than a degree to the south of Jupiter high in the evening sky. Your closed fist held out at arms length covers 10 degrees. These two wont get that close again until 2026.

2) February 2-23 — Best Evening View of Mercury

The planet Mercury will be far enough away from the glare of the Sun to be visible in the Western sky after sunset. It will be at its brightest on the 16th and dim quickly afterwards. On the 8th it will skim by the much dimmer planet Mars by about 0.4 degrees.

3) March 10-24 — Comet PANSTARRS at its best

First discovered in 2011, this comet should be coming back around for about 2 weeks. It will be visible low in the northwest sky after sunset. Here are some sources predicting what the comets may look like in the sky; 1, 2

4) April 25 — Partial Lunar Eclipse

A very minor, partial lunar eclipse (not visible in North America) where only about 2 percent of the moon’s diameter will be inside the dark shadow of the Earth.

5) May 9 — Annular Eclipse of the Sun (“Ring of Fire” Eclipse)

It will be visible in Northern Australia and parts of Papua New Guinea but mostly within the Pacific Ocean. See all the solar eclipse paths for 2001-2020 here.

6) May 24-30 — Dance of the Planets

Mercury, Venus and Jupiter will seemingly dance between each other in the twilight sky just after sunset as they will change their positions from one evening to the next. Venus will be the brightest of all, six times brighter than Jupiter.

7) June 23 — Biggest Full Moon of 2013

It will be the biggest full moon because the moon will be the closest to the Earth at this time making it a ‘supermoon’ and the tides will be affected as well creating exceptionally high and low tides for the next few days.

8) August 12 — Perseid Meteor Shower

One of the best and most reliable meteor showers of the year producing upwards of 90 meteors per hour provided the sky is dark. This year the moon won’t be in the way as much as it will set during the evening leaving the rest of the night dark. Here is a useful dark-sky finder tool.

9) October 18 — Penumbral Eclipse of the Moon

Visible mostly in Asia, Europe and Africa, at this time the 76% of the moon will be covered by the penumbral shadow of the Earth.

10) November 3 — Hybrid Eclipse of the Sun

A Hybrid Eclipse meaning, along its path, the eclipse will turn from Annular to Total and in this case most of the path will appear to be Total as there will be a slight ring of sunlight visible near the beginning of the track. This one will begin in the Atlantic (near the East Coast of the U.S.) and travel through Africa. See the path here. The greatest eclipse (with 100 seconds of totality) will appear in Liberia, near the West Coast of Africa.

11) Mid-November through December — Comet ISON

The second comet this year, ISON, could potentially be visible in broad daylight as it reaches its closest point to the Sun. It will reach that point on November 28 and it is close enough to the Sun to be categorized as a ‘Sungrazer’. Afterwards it will travel towards Earth (passing by within 40 million miles) a month later.

12) All of December — Dazzling Venus

The brightest planet of them all will shine a few hours after sundown in the Southwestern sky and for about 1.5 hours approaching New Years Eve. Around December 5th, a crescent moon will pass above the planet and the next night Venus will be at its brightest and wont be again until 2021.

13) December 13-14 — Geminid Meteor Shower

This is another great (if not the best) annual meteor shower. This year put on a show at about 120 meteors per hour and in 2013 it won’t be much different so expect another fantastic show. However, the moon - as it is a few days before full phase - will be in the way for most of the night obscuring some of the fainter meteors. You might have to stay up in the early morning hours (4am) to catch the all the meteors it has to offer. If you missed 2012’s Geminid Meteor Shower, here are some great photo-sets; 1, 2, 3

stalf0s
breakingnews:

Mars rover Curiosity finds signs of ancient stream
Scientists say NASA’s Curiosity rover has found signs that a stream once flowed across the surface near the site where it landed on Mars. Read more from NBC News.Photo: In this image from NASA’s Curiosity rover, a rock outcrop called Link pops out from a Martian surface that is elsewhere blanketed by reddish-brown dust. The picture was taken on Sept. 2, the 27th Martian day of Curiosity’s mission. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

breakingnews:

Mars rover Curiosity finds signs of ancient stream

Scientists say NASA’s Curiosity rover has found signs that a stream once flowed across the surface near the site where it landed on Mars. Read more from NBC News.

Photo: In this image from NASA’s Curiosity rover, a rock outcrop called Link pops out from a Martian surface that is elsewhere blanketed by reddish-brown dust. The picture was taken on Sept. 2, the 27th Martian day of Curiosity’s mission. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

stalf0s
vondell-swain:

‘Wanderers’ - an MSL/Curiosity commemoration print
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is a robotic mission to Mars launched by NASA on November 26, 2011, that will attempt to land a Mars rover called Curiosity on the surface of Mars. Currently en route to the planet, it is scheduled to land in Gale Crater at about 05:31 UTC on August 6, 2012. Curiosity rover’s objectives include determining Mars’ habitability, studying its climate and geology, and collecting data for human missions.
This artwork is available as a print in a wide variety of sizes for a wide variety of prices on my society6 page.
For more information about the Curiosity rover, including its incredibly complex and nervewracking plan of descent onto the surface of Mars, check out this SciShow episode.

vondell-swain:

‘Wanderers’ - an MSL/Curiosity commemoration print

Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is a robotic mission to Mars launched by NASA on November 26, 2011, that will attempt to land a Mars rover called Curiosity on the surface of Mars. Currently en route to the planet, it is scheduled to land in Gale Crater at about 05:31 UTC on August 6, 2012. Curiosity rover’s objectives include determining Mars’ habitability, studying its climate and geology, and collecting data for human missions.

This artwork is available as a print in a wide variety of sizes for a wide variety of prices on my society6 page.

For more information about the Curiosity rover, including its incredibly complex and nervewracking plan of descent onto the surface of Mars, check out this SciShow episode.

tentakrule

itsfullofstars:

Planetscape Paintings from an Interstellar Journey

“Today the art department at image and VFX design studio Framestore has shared with us some of their original illustrations of a mission into interstellar space. Here you can see what future explorers might see as they encounter a new planetary system, and survey the planets and moons there. There are some bizarre anomalies, and some places that look a lot like home.

This gallery, called “Journey,” is part of io9 and Gizmodo’s “First Comes the Dream” series, where we celebrate what inspires us to make scientific discoveries, engineer life-changing machines, and offer a new perspective on the world with science fiction. Tomorrow night, we’ll be celebrating dreams and their realization at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, where these gorgeous images will be projected on the walls of the Planetarium. We’ll be tweeting from the event, and filming a live conversation with AMNH astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson about what inspires him.

This isn’t the last you’ll see of these images either. If they are already suggesting a story to you, that’s the idea. Starting in August, we’ll be trying out a new kind of collaborative storytelling with Framestore’s images, where you supply the story and their art department will respond by making more images to fit where our story is headed. So stay tuned for that, and keep dreaming!”

Source: io9.com

Click here and see more images.

lookingthroughlaurels

daphnemir:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Suprasensorial: experiments in light, color, and space.

currently on display in ‘suprasensorial - experiments in light, color, and space
at the hirshhorn museum and sculpture garden through 5.13.2012 (recommended visit!)
stunning photo documentation by nord wennerstrom

the hirshhorn presents suprasensorial: experiments in light, color, and space, the first exhibition to reevaluate the evolution of the international light and space movement through the work of five pivotal latin american artists: carlos cruz-diez (b. caracas, venezuela, 1923), lucio fontana (b. rosario, argentina, 1899; d. varese, italy, 1968), julio le parc (b. mendoza, argentina, 1928), hélio oiticica (b. rio de janeiro, brazil, 1937; d. rio de janeiro, 1980), and jesús rafael soto (b. ciudad bolívar, venezuela, 1923; d. paris, france, 2005). 

photos copyright © nord wennerstrom via nord on art blog

I saw this at LA MOCA on a trip with some of my fellow lighting designers at CalArts and it was absolutely wondrous. I highly recommend going if you can!

Protip: For the piece shown above, spend a while in each room. At least 20 minutes. Maybe go with a friend and sit and chat, then close your eyes and advance to the next room before you open them.

itsfullofstars

fyeahcosmonauts:

ikenbot:

Cosmonaut Couture: Russian Photo Shoot Makes Space Sexy

Photos like this could pass for a Cold War-era Russian propaganda program, or perhaps shots straight from the set of the movie Moonraker — if not for a stray pair of late-20th century sneakers.

Renowned fashion photographer Arthur Elgort, now 72, actually created these images for the December 1999 issue of Russian Vogue.

In the images, supermodel Natalia Semanova mingles with real-life cosmonauts at Star City, a town northeast of Moscow and home of the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, where for more than 50 years the Russian Federal Space Agency has trained willing citizens to fly in space. (Recently they’ve also been trained to survive 520 days inside a tin can.)

The photos experienced a recent resurgence in social media circles, so Wired tracked down Elgort to learn more about the timeless photos.

Check the source for more images and information on them..

I posted some of these photos 2 weeks ago but check out the article, the photographer talks about working with the cosmonauts.

itsfullofstars
itsfullofstars:

Stephen Hawking: Women Are ‘A Complete Mystery’
Professor Stephen Hawking, one of the world’s most eminent physicists, has admitted that women number among black holes and supersymmetry as one of the greatest mysteries in the universe.
In an interview with New Scientist magazine ahead of his 70th birthday on Sunday, Hawking was asked what he thinks about most during the day.
“Women,” he replied. “They are a complete mystery”.
Hawking was diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21, and was expected to live for just a few years.
Since his diagnosis Hawking has gone on to become one of the world’s most famous scientists, both for his academic work on black holes and his books including A Brief History Of Time, which has sold more than 10m copies since 1988.
In the interview with New Scientist, Hawking also refers to the “blunders” that have blighted his academic and also his personal life.
Keep reading.

itsfullofstars:

Stephen Hawking: Women Are ‘A Complete Mystery’

Professor Stephen Hawking, one of the world’s most eminent physicists, has admitted that women number among black holes and supersymmetry as one of the greatest mysteries in the universe.

In an interview with New Scientist magazine ahead of his 70th birthday on Sunday, Hawking was asked what he thinks about most during the day.

“Women,” he replied. “They are a complete mystery”.

Hawking was diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21, and was expected to live for just a few years.

Since his diagnosis Hawking has gone on to become one of the world’s most famous scientists, both for his academic work on black holes and his books including A Brief History Of Time, which has sold more than 10m copies since 1988.

In the interview with New Scientist, Hawking also refers to the “blunders” that have blighted his academic and also his personal life.

Keep reading.